10 Rules of Trade Show Etiquette

04/10/18 by Brandon

This post will discuss the 10 Rules of Trade Show Etiquette.

Rule #1: Greet Your Visitors Warmly – This means to greet them saying something like “Let me share with you what we are doing here at our company.” By doing this, you are drawing the visitors in with no pressure. It is not just a simple question where you only get a “yes” or “no” answer. As discussed in an earlier session people who attend shows are either decision makers or influencers. It is important to greet them warmly to draw their attention.

Rule #2: Contact Information – When a person steps into your booth, after thanking them, ask them why they are here and follow-up with them accordingly. When taking down the prospect’s information and requirements, personalize it for the sales person who has to follow up.

Rule #3: No Food or Drink in the Booth – It just creates a bad impression in front of visitors when the staff is eating in the booth.

Rule #4: No Chairs – It is really important that all sales staff be alert and available to help visitors. There should be open communication between the sales and prospects without any chairs or tables between them. Yes, you can still have a chair and a table in a conference room or lounge setting to have a more private conversation with the client/prospect.

Rule #5: Customer Comes First – Sales personnel at the booth should not be conversing among each other. It is important they be alert and attentive to visitors.

Rule #6: Adhering to the Schedule – All staff at the booth should be diligent about being on time for the hours they are scheduled. They should show up fifteen minutes early to relieve their colleagues.

Rule #7: Employees should let the Customer Eat First – At company hosted parties or conference events, it is important that customers are in line first and the staff later.

Rule #8: Minimum Alcohol for all the Company Personnel – Whether it is at a specific company venue or an association event, there should be minimum alcohol consumed by company personnel.

Rule #9: Listen More and Talk Less – It is important to allow the prospect to say what they want and listen to them rather than your salespeople doing most of the talking.

Rule #10: Learn about the Association – When attending an association or organization event it is important to learn about the association. For example: “What are the issues that they are facing?” And, “What did the president of the organization or association say at the last meeting about their future goals?” This creates a powerful impression for the sales staff when in conversation with a prospect belonging to that association. It shows that they are informed and care about the industry.

Next week, we’ll continue our interview with Mike Gruenberg by looking into show roles and guidelines.